Simone | 1990 | USA
I'm a writer, editor, and geek in the Seattle area.
I write about games at Pixelkin, and tweet about games @doomquasar.

This is a personal blog and a fandom blog, unrelated to my work.

starbuckers:

I wish my name was brad so that I would be 75% rad

fishingboatproceeds:

In regards to the panic that will inevitably spread in re the first case of ebola in the United States, watch this health care triage video. (Also discussed: the panic of enterovirus, which is the virus that caused my meningitis.)

As Dr. Amesh Adalja put it, ““Ebola outbreaks are stopped in their tracks when basic public health measures are in place … and the United States would not be a hospitable environment for something that spreads exclusively through blood and body fluids.”

Ebola IS a huge, growing public health problem in several nations in west Africa. Because it has hit health care workers particularly hard, there are fewer health workers and resources available in already poorly equipped nations. That’s a disaster not only because of ebola but also because it means fewer vaccinated children and more deaths from preventable illnesses like malaria and diarrhea. Panicking over ebola in the United States distracts from the real problem, which is the thousands of needless deaths in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea.

mochytea:


there will be murder

this fucking lp series will be the death of me (pun intended)

mochytea:

there will be murder

this fucking lp series will be the death of me (pun intended)

lichgem:

vivzie-pop:

owlygem:

neocybex:

feeling sad? please watch this kitten being brushed

when I watched this I was litterally like “NO. NOOOOO. OH MY GOD”

oh my god.

BOUHRGEYER THE MUSIC

THE FUCKING MUSIC

cashmerethoughtsss:

Queen Onika will host MTV’s EMAs

caramelflanlatte:

me when I wake up

caramelflanlatte:

me when I wake up

boromirs:

Henry V., IV.III

luhanburgerandfries:

"It was on a Sunday morning, July 12th, that Paris heard of the dismissal of Necker. The day was fair, and a crowd assembled at the Palais-Royal in the afternoon. Amazement and consternation soon turned into indignation and fury. Orators gathered audiences by improvised speeches which they filled with imprecations. […]
Soon demonstrators swarmed in the streets. The main body left the Palais-Royal at four o’clock, going off to close the theatres […]. Busts of Necker and the duc d’Orleans, seized at Curtius’ waxworks, were paraded on the boulevard. Returning to the Palais-Royal, the crowd started for the Champs-Elysees.
A unit of cavalry now intervened. But it met armed resistance from some of the French Guards, who appeared at the same time, taking sides with the people. The Royal German regiment, commanded by the prince de Lambesc, at about eight o’clock tried to drive the demonstrators from the Place Louis XV, now the Place de la Concorde. The crowd flowed back toward the Tuileries, and from a position on the terrace proceeded to stone the cavalrymen, who nevertheless continued to charge, knocking over and injuring several persons. No doubt there were other skirmishes of which we know nothing.”
-The Coming of the French Revolution, by Georges Lefebvre
The painting is from the storming of the Bastille, two days after the dismissal of Necker. It amazes what we know about history- it was a fair day in Paris on July 12th, 1789. And all these places are still standing today. I’ve stood in them, on a fair day in 2011.

luhanburgerandfries:

"It was on a Sunday morning, July 12th, that Paris heard of the dismissal of Necker. The day was fair, and a crowd assembled at the Palais-Royal in the afternoon. Amazement and consternation soon turned into indignation and fury. Orators gathered audiences by improvised speeches which they filled with imprecations. […]

Soon demonstrators swarmed in the streets. The main body left the Palais-Royal at four o’clock, going off to close the theatres […]. Busts of Necker and the duc d’Orleans, seized at Curtius’ waxworks, were paraded on the boulevard. Returning to the Palais-Royal, the crowd started for the Champs-Elysees.

A unit of cavalry now intervened. But it met armed resistance from some of the French Guards, who appeared at the same time, taking sides with the people. The Royal German regiment, commanded by the prince de Lambesc, at about eight o’clock tried to drive the demonstrators from the Place Louis XV, now the Place de la Concorde. The crowd flowed back toward the Tuileries, and from a position on the terrace proceeded to stone the cavalrymen, who nevertheless continued to charge, knocking over and injuring several persons. No doubt there were other skirmishes of which we know nothing.”

-The Coming of the French Revolution, by Georges Lefebvre

The painting is from the storming of the Bastille, two days after the dismissal of Necker. It amazes what we know about history- it was a fair day in Paris on July 12th, 1789. And all these places are still standing today. I’ve stood in them, on a fair day in 2011.